Clampdown on ads proposed

Nelson Mandela Bay metro police chief Yolande Faro has proposed a massive operation to help clamp down on illegal advertising in the metro
Nelson Mandela Bay metro police chief Yolande Faro has proposed a massive operation to help clamp down on illegal advertising in the metro
Image: Werner Hills

If you are sick of seeing posters advertising abortions and penis enlargements, it could soon become a thing of the past.

That is if Nelson Mandela Bay metro police chief Yolande Faro has her way.

She has proposed a massive operation to help clamp down on illegal advertising in the metro, saying it played a big role in obstructing the view of motorists on the roads.

Faro will present her plan at the next safety and security portfolio committee meeting.

The meeting was meant to be held on August 12 but was postponed until further notice as the council is in recess.

In a report to the committee, Faro wrote that outdoor advertising had become a dirty and tacky sight.

“The present proliferation of all forms of outdoor advertising has made the city look tacky and unsightly.

“Not only do some of these signs obstruct the view for motorists and pedestrians, but [they] create a dirty and disorderly look and feel to the city, and a feeling of chaos,” Faro wrote.

In the report, Faro wrote that the purpose of the document was to actively address all public complaints on illegal advertising at “problematic hotspots” in the metro.

On Friday, Faro said the areas where illegal advertising was particularly prevalent were the Central Business District, Govan Mbeki Avenue from City Hall up to the Post Office, Strand Street, Donkin Street and Russell Road.

Other areas were Newton Park, North End, Walmer, Uitenhage, Despatch and all industrial areas.

Faro said the aim was to “regulate and enforce the outdoor advertising bylaw through an integrated approach”.

The clampdown will also include involving building inspectors, the Mandela Bay Development Agency, the city’s public health department and metro police.

Offenders who fail to comply with the bylaws or any notices will be fined an amount not exceeding R15,000 and if they default on payment they face imprisonment for up to six months.

Building inspectors will ensure that bylaws linked to advertising are followed while the public health department will help with the removal of adverts and other rubbish.

While the municipality is going for illegal advertisers, it will also try to persuade legal advertisers to adjust already existing advertising and signs.

During the operation, foot and vehicle patrols of identified problematic areas will enforce the outdoor signs bylaw and the road and traffic bylaw.

The illegal adverts will be impounded.

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