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‘I have seen people win elections on Twitter but not in reality’: Ronald Lamola tells Mzwanele Manyi

Justice and correctional services minister Ronald Lamola says a poll conducted on Twitter is not reality. File photo.
Justice and correctional services minister Ronald Lamola says a poll conducted on Twitter is not reality. File photo.
Image: Freddy Mavunda

Justice minister Ronald Lamola has hit back at African Transformation Movement (ATM) leader Mzwanele Manyi following his claims that people have no confidence in the judiciary.

Manyi this week shared the results of a Twitter poll he conducted asking his followers if they had confidence in the judiciary.

According to the results, of the 4,408 who participated in the poll, 72% voted no and 28% voted yes.

“Dear minister Ronald Lamola, ConCourt tweeps have spoken loud and clear,” said Manyi.

In his response, Lamola hinted he was not bothered by the results, saying they were not reality.

“I have also seen people win elections on Twitter but not in reality. But we must welcome all views. Thanks, comrade Mzwanele Manyi,” he said.

Reacting to the response, Manyi said he was hoping Lamola would say one unhappy citizen was one too many and commit to conveying the message to chief justice Raymond Zondo. 

“On May 1, a crowd significantly smaller than 4,000 managed to chase away a head of state in Rustenburg. Was hoping you’d say one unhappy citizen is one too many and commit to convey the message to the CJ,” he said.

Earlier this week, Lamola also hit back at former Ekurhuleni mayor Mzwandile Masina for criticising his decision to attend a court outcome.

“Whoever advises Ronald Lamola to attend a court outcome is a fool. Either way, if the court ruled in favour of each faction, he remains the minister of justice. This will weaken him or his standing as the political head of the courts,” said Masina.

Lamola said Masina’s lack of understanding of what judicial independence entails was sad.

“It is sad that a senior comrade does not understand what judicial independence entails. Judges do not have a political head. Our courts are independent, they do not account to a politician. We must be able [to] grasp simple concepts of state craft before opining incorrect positions,” said Lamola.

“The judiciary is [a] separate arm of the state. Surely he should know what the Trias Politica entails?” .


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