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Final sitting for SAHRC panel probing July 2021 unrest

President Cyril Ramaphosa at the SAHRC hearing on the July 2021 unrest on April 1 2022 in Sandton. The commission will conclude hearing oral evidence on Tuesday.
President Cyril Ramaphosa at the SAHRC hearing on the July 2021 unrest on April 1 2022 in Sandton. The commission will conclude hearing oral evidence on Tuesday.
Image: Alaister Russell/The Sunday Times

The SA Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) will on Tuesday conclude hearing oral evidence in the investigative hearing into the July 2021 unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng.

The hearing is chaired by commissioner Andre Gaum. Commissioners Philile Ntuli and Chris Nissen are also members of the panel.

“The commission will hear oral evidence from the social cohesion group. The sitting on June 21 marks the close of the receipt of oral evidence,” it said.

During the various sessions, the commission received a large amount of written and oral evidence from affected community members, civil society organisations, experts and business organisations.  

The commission said in the previous session of the hearing President Cyril Ramaphosa recognised the importance of the probe and articulated his support for the process.

Other members of cabinet, including police minister Bheki Cele and former defence and military veterans minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula, also testified before the commission.

Circumstances around the unrest in July last year implicated basic human rights such as the right to security, the right to be free from all forms of violence, the right not to have one’s possessions seized and the right to life, the commission said.

“The events which plunged the country into a crisis have had direct impacts on human rights and long term implications for people and the economic health of the country beyond the two provinces where the unrest occurred.

“The probe by the commission as an independent constitutional body is therefore a necessary response allowing reflection on the causes, outcomes and responses during the unrest with a view to ensuring that a human rights crisis of such a nature does not again befall the country.”

TimesLIVE

 


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