Myths and misinformation could be preventing KZN's elderly from vaccinating

The KwaZulu-Natal government believes misinformation spread about the Covid-19 vaccines may have discouraged some of the elderly from getting vaccinated. File photo.
The KwaZulu-Natal government believes misinformation spread about the Covid-19 vaccines may have discouraged some of the elderly from getting vaccinated. File photo.
Image: Sebabatso Mosamo

The KwaZulu-Natal government believes myths and misinformation about safety of the Covid-19 vaccination may have led to fewer senior citizens wanting to take the jab.

Speaking at a media briefing on Sunday, premier Sihle Zikalala said there was concern about the lower rate of vaccinations in the province.

“We are vaccinating, on average, 30,000 people each day between Monday and Friday, and less than 10,000 over weekends.

“What is even more concerning is that people who fall under the vulnerable 60 plus age group are no longer registering or coming forward to get vaccinated.

“We still have about 400,000 of these senior citizens – who are at higher risk of succumbing to Covid-19 if they get infected - who have not been vaccinated.”

The premier said the 18-34 group - who are less at risk of suffering Covid-19 complications - were doing much better when it came to vaccinating, compared to those 60 and older.

“This shows, again, the level of damage that has been caused by all the myths and misinformation around the safety of the vaccine,” he said.

Zikalala said the third wave in the province appeared less severe compared to the second wave.

“Our third wave has been characterised by a fluctuation in the number of new cases, hospitalisations and deaths.

“Thankfully, the curve so far appears to have been less severe this time around.

“It has also been driven by clusters in schools, meaning that a high number of learners and educators have been affected in eThekwini, Umgungundlovu, King Cetshwayo, Umkhanyakude and iLembe districts.

“A number of cluster cases have also been found at correctional centres, which affected employees and inmates.”

TimesLIVE


subscribe