'Shouldn’t nurses wear gloves while giving the vaccine?': Ndlozi questions Ramaphosa's Covid-19 jab

Mbuyiseni Ndlozi questioned the lack of gloves when vaccinating against Covid-19. File photo.
Mbuyiseni Ndlozi questioned the lack of gloves when vaccinating against Covid-19. File photo.
Image: Brian Witbooi/The Herald

While the country welcomed the first day of Covid-19 vaccine rollouts, EFF MP Mbuyiseni Ndlozi has raised concerns over nurses administrating the vaccination process without gloves.

On Tuesday, President Cyril Ramaphosa and health minister Zweli Mkhize, along with a number of health-care workers, received the Johnson & Johnson (J&J) jab in Khayelitsha, Cape Town.

Ramaphosa described the jab process as “just a prick on my flesh” and hailed the first vaccinations as a “real milestone” for SA.

“At first I was a bit terrified of this long needle that was going to be embedded into my arm, but it happened so quickly, so easily, it was just a prick on my flesh and I really did not feel much pain,” Ramaphosa said.

“I was rather pleased that five people were vaccinated before me, they were health workers. It was a joy to watch them, to see whether anything had happened to them.”

However, Ndlozi questioned the lack of gloves while administering the vaccine, saying he hoped it was not due to a shortage of supplies.

“I hope the absence [of] gloves with the Ramaphosa vaccination is not due to some procurement inadequacy.

“Shouldn’t nurses wear gloves to administer this J&J vaccine? Or [do] they sanitise immediately?” he asked on Twitter.

Ndlozi's concern was shared by social media users.

However, according to the Washington state department of health, gloves are not recommended to be worn when administering the Covid-19 vaccination, unless the person administering the vaccination has open sores on their hands or is likely to come into contact with a patient’s body fluids.

“Gloves are not recommended for most vaccination administration and are not required for the Covid-19 vaccine unless the person administering the vaccine is likely to come into contact with potentially infectious body fluids or has open lesions on their hands,” it said.

“If used improperly, gloves can increase the likelihood of spreading germs.”


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