Evangelist tells of prophetic dreams

CHRISTIAN MEN: Speaker at the Christian Men’s Association breakfast on Saturday morning, Henry Laubscher (centre), flanked by organisers Charlie Parsons (left) and Leon Coetzee Picture: ROB KNOWLES

ROB KNOWLES

PREACHER and evangelist Henry Laubscher spoke of his epiphany that made him serve the church, as well as his prophetic dreams and their interpretation, at Christian Men’s Association breakfast at the Port Alfred Ski-boat Club on Saturday morning.

Laubscher, who is married to Janet and has two grown-up sons, told of his epiphany at the Breakthrough Church in Johannesburg where he eventually became a leader. He told of the “fire” that built within him, scary but exciting, and how that changed his life forever.

Laubscher also shared his love of underprivileged children, and the work he does at the Jan Hofmeyer Centre in Johannesburg’s southern suburbs in support of them.

However, the main thrust of his talk was his ability to experience prophetic dreams.

“Unfortunately, the dreams rely on interpretation,” Laubscher admitted, “and I don’t always get their meanings right.”

Laubscher spoke of a visit to a hospital where he prayed over a woman dying of cancer. He said he could remember dreaming and seeing a white tear falling onto the woman, and that at the time he thought this meant she was about to die.

Still, after consultation with his mentor and dream interpreter Delene Grobelaar, she informed him that God does not cry tears for the dying, but rather it was His healing of the woman. Sure enough, when Laubscher returned the woman had been discharged from hospital apparently cancer-free.

Laubscher shared the fact he was a sickly child who suffered from a number of ailments during childhood, including rheumatic fever. As an adult a spot was discovered on his lungs.

In denial, Laubscher decided he would seek advice from the church he had dedicated his life to rather than undergo an operation to have it removed. He visited his pastor who laid hands on him and, for the first time, Laubscher found himself speaking in tongues.

“I returned to the doctor a week later for a check up, and he was amazed he couldn’t find any trace of the spot. He said it was a miracle,” he told his audience.

Laubscher also spoke of an incident that occurred when travelling through Zambia when another member of the party wanted to visit some site where the view of the mountains was particularly beautiful.

Despite protestation, Laubscher reluctantly took him to the spot, where they were attacked by bandits. As the others had already ascended the mountain Laubscher had to fight off his attacker alone who, although he had the opportunity and was armed with a panga, did not kill him but simply took the keys to his SUV.

On returning the visitors found themselves stranded and decided to spend the night in the vehicle.

Laubscher, badly beaten and cut, had a dream where he witnessed the keys just a kilometre from where they were sitting. However, it wasn’t until the next morning that the party left him convalescing in the vehicle and set off for help. Sure enough, they returned with the local police officer and the keys they found lying on the road just a kilometre from their vehicle.

“God tells us things, but sometimes we need help to correctly interpret His meaning,” said Laubscher.

Laubscher will be returning to Johannesburg shortly after his two-month stay in Port Alfred.

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