Young disabled golfers get chance to improve swing

Neale Emslie

FIRST LESSON: Introducing disabled children at Cape Recife, Keisha Johnson, left, and Siviwe Matikinka, both 7, to the game of golf are SA Disabled Golfers' Association chief executive Eugene Vorster, left, and PE Nomads member Martin King. Picture: EUGENE COETZEE
FIRST LESSON: Introducing disabled children at Cape Recife, Keisha Johnson, left, and Siviwe Matikinka, both 7, to the game of golf are SA Disabled Golfers’ Association chief executive Eugene Vorster, left, and PE Nomads member Martin King. Picture: EUGENE COETZEE

NOMADS golfers have thrown their weight behind an initiative to assist disabled players with a series of events at schools in Port Elizabeth.

The roadshows are part of a drive by the SA Disabled Golf Association (Sadga) to grow the development of the sport among the disabled community, a programme sponsored by Nomads.

The shows form part of Sadga’s First Swing Programme which presents the game to disabled pupils in a fun format on a modified golf course taken to schools.

The programme went to Cape Recife School and Cheshire Homes, as well as Lonwabo and Reubin Biring in Missionvale.

Sadga executive director Eugene Vorster says the programme caters for five levels, each of which in turn accommodates blind and deaf as well as physically disabled juniors.

Level one is for juniors who cannot leave the school and are catered for in the school building with a specially designed course.

Level two takes place on school fields, while level three is for juniors who can complete nine holes of regular golf.

Level four is for those who have an official handicap and will take part in the Nedbank SA Disabled Golf Open.

Level five is for the most talented golfers who have single-figure handicaps and compete nationally and internationally.

“Nomads Golf Club SA is proud to be associated with the hard work that Sadga does with the children who are not able to enjoy this great game to the same extent as able-bodied children,” Nomads national chairman Greg Clack said.

“To see the joy on these youngsters’ faces as they achieve something like hitting a ball 20 metres or sinking a putt makes all the hard work we do worthwhile.”

 

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